DESIGN REVIEW GUIDELINES 

APPROVED FEBRUARY 2011

Section I: Introduction and Purpose of the Design Guidelines

Section II: The Covenant

Section III: What Needs Approval Section IV: Design Guidelines

Section IV: Design Guidelines

A. Site Design

  • Siting
  • Grading and drainage
  • Orientation
  • Fencing and screen walls
  • Driveways and walkways
  • Patios and decks

B. Building scale and form

C. Exterior walls and materials

D. Windows and doors

E. Roofs

F. Colors

G. Garages, carports, and non-attached structures

 

Section V: Procedures for Approval

Step 1: Determine the Appropriate Type of Review

  • Administrative Review
  • Standard Review
  • Expanded Review

Step 2: Follow the Appropriate Review Process

  • Administrative Review
  • Standard Review
  • Expanded Review

DRC Processes

Action Required Prior to Construction

Action During Construction

Appeal Procedures

Enforcement

 

Section VI: Composition and Role of DRC

 

Section VII: Appendix

A: Covenants

B: Diagrams

C: Application Checklist

D: Design Review Applicant Questionnaire

E: Sample Neighbor Notification Letter

 


 

Section I: Introduction and Purpose of the Design Review Guidelines

From the beginning, Hollin Hills has been a unique place. Its hilly terrain, curvilinear street patterns, and modernist, open-plan houses with huge windows were unlike any other neighborhood in Virginia, and it was among the few modernist post-war subdivisions nationwide. Hollin Hills grew out of the careful, holistic planning of developer Robert Davenport, architect Charles Goodman, and landscape architects Bernard Voigt, Eric Paepcke, and Dan Kiley. The first of many accolades and awards for Hollin Hills came shortly after the first houses were completed and occupied. Invariably, the citations stressed design excellence:

  • “Best Houses Under $15,000.” Life, 1951.
  • Hollin Hills named “Nation’s Outstanding Development.” Southwest Research Institute, 1951.
  • Charles M. Goodman named “Architect of the Year.” Southwest Research Institute, 1951.
  • Robert C. Davenport named “Developer of the Year.” Southwest Research Institute, 1951.
  • “Best Home for Family Living.” Parents’ Magazine, 1952.
  • “One of 10 Buildings in America’s Future.” The American Institute of Architects, 1957.

Design excellence has been an inherent part of the character of Hollin Hills throughout its six-decade history. That character has been guarded by protective covenants on the land, required for the development to qualify for FHA mortgage underwriting. The protective covenants—and the Design Review Committee (DRC) formed by the community to interpret their application on its behalf—have served Hollin Hills well, as evidenced by the awards and accolades won since the last house was completed in 1971:

  • Fairfax County Inventory of Historic Sites, 1977.
  • “Test of Time Award.” Virginia Society of the American Institute of Architects, 1982.
  • “Design Award for Continuing Contributions to Community Appearance,” Northern Virginia Community Appearance Alliance, 1989.
  • National Register of Historic Places

Design excellence has remained a priority for Hollin Hills residents as we have evolved our mid-20th Century homes for 21st Century living.

 

Additions are the principal evidence of that evolution, and many of those have been noted in published works and have won awards:

  • “Home Improvement 1967: Seven Subdivision Houses — How They Grew,” Better Homes and Gardens, 1967.
  • Remodeling: How Good Houses Get Even Better,” Better Homes and Gardens, 1975.
  • “Let the Sun Shine In,” Washington Post, 1976. “Award for Excellence,” Northern Virginia
  • Chapter of the American Institute of Architects
  • and the Virginia Society of the American Institute of Architects, 1997.
  • “Honorable Mention,” Fairfax County Excep- tional Design Awards, 2005.

The guidelines that follow respond to and articulate the community’s desire to protect the unique character of Hollin Hills. The purpose of the guidelines is to help preserve the historic character of the community by identifying and describing the homes and their character-defining features while also allowing flexibility for innovation -- a fundamental characteristic of Hollin Hills from the beginning.

 


 

Section II: The Covenant

The legal basis for the existence of a design review process is found in the Hollin Hills Deeds of Dedication, which include several covenants. Among them is a restrictive covenant, which is essentially a contractual agreement under which deed holders agree to refrain from building without prior approval of the DRC (formerly, known as the Architectural Review Committee). The authority of the DRC comes from the covenant included in each deed. A sample covenant is shown in Appendix A. The covenant further allows that both community and individual landowners have the right to enforce this covenant.

 

The authority of the DRC is automatic for all sections of Hollin Hills. This means that the covenant is automatically extended for successive periods of ten years, unless by vote of majority of then owners of the lots it is agreed to change said covenants in whole or in part.

 


 

Section III – What Needs Approval

Unless specifically indicated otherwise in this document, all new construction and all alterations that affect the visual appearance of any building or structure require approval by the DRC to assure the maintenance of what the covenant refers to as “harmony and conformity of external design with existing structures in the subdivision.” Exterior alterations that are not visible from the street DO require DRC approval. Hollin Hills was designed holistically, and any proposed alterations must be considered in that context.

 

The covenant’s reference to building and structure means that which is built or constructed. Accordingly, fences, decks, detached, accessory structures (sheds, carports, pool/tennis enclosures, greenhouses, etc.), gazebos, trellises, awnings, retaining walls, and freestanding walls all require approval. In addition to obtaining DRC approval, it is the homeowner’s responsibility to be aware of and comply with all jurisdictional (Fairfax County) building codes and zoning requirements.

 

When no approval or review is required

Projects that do not change the external appearance of the property do not require review or approval by the DRC. These include interior renovations that have no visible external implications and exterior repairs that do not change the exterior appearance. Homeowners should assume that any alterations not explicitly indicated on the list below will require approval and should contact the DRC to determine the level of review required. Contact information for the DRC is available on the CAHH website at Design Review.

 

The following items do not require DRC review or approval by the DRC:

  • Interior alterations
  • Planting, gardens, and mulching, although homeowners are encouraged to refer to the Landscape Design Recommendations on the CAHH website
  • Changes to topography (Please note that Fairfax County has strict requirements that protect neighbors from changes in topography which may increase runoff onto their )
  • In-ground ponds and water features less than 100 square feet in area and lower than 24” high
  • Loose gravel and nongrouted stepping stone pathways
  • Nonpermanent landscape features, such as lawn ornaments, bird baths, sculptures, portable basketball hoops, and children’s playsets
  • Edging and landscape walls 24” high or less
  • Mailboxes
  • Flagpoles
  • Minor exterior lighting, such as low-voltage landscape lights
  • Overhead and underground utility lines
  • Minor vents required for appliances and furnaces
  • Maintenance or repair of existing exterior elements so long as the visual appearance does not change
  • Re-pointing, maintenance, and in-kind repair of existing masonry
  • In-kind replacement of damaged or deterio- rated materials, such as siding and roofing, with the same exact materials, profiles, dimensions, and details
  • Replacement of broken glass provided the visual appearance of the windows, including frame shape, size and profiles, do not change
  • Re-sealing and in-kind repair or maintenance of existing driveways and walkways
  • Painting and changes to paint colors (please see recommendations for paint colors in Section IV)
  • Temporary seasonal screening around garden plots, provided it no higher than 48” and is not located in the front

 

Section IV: Design Guidelines

This section outlines the historic design characteristics that established and distinguish Hollin Hills, as well as considerations for new construction and alterations. The Standards of Original Design provide a historic benchmark against which future changes can be measured. They also serve as a brief guide for homeowners interested in the original appearance of their house. For more detailed information on the history, architecture, and landscape of Hollin Hills, please refer to Hollin Hills, Community of Vision: a Semicentennial History 1949-1999, available in the Civic Association section of this website.

 

 

"The defining features for any Hollin Hills house include the site, plan arrangements, facade designs, windows and doors, roofs, and materials…The unique character of Hollin HIlls is defined by our celebration of these features."

 

 

This section is meant to identify and describe these “historic” ideas, which provide a foundation upon which to build as we move into future. The basic Goodman design features (i.e., roof shapes, wall types, window shapes, color palettes, siting concepts, and construction details) should be used as a starting point for new designs. These features can be sympathetically adapted to meet contemporary needs and technological advances, and it is recognized that alterations are not required to maintain complete adherence to the original design.

 

The defining features for any Hollin Hills house include the site, plan arrangements, facade designs, windows and doors, roofs, and materials. Although designs for Hollin Hills homes evolved over the 25-year construction history of the community, by looking for these features one can begin to see similar design characteristics appearing throughout Hollin Hills. The unique character of Hollin Hills is defined by our celebration of these features.

 

Although there are basic features common to all Hollin Hills houses, there are variations in the way the elements fit together. The earliest homes were simple rectangular and split-level plans with low-slope gable roofs. Some of the split levels had low-slope shed roofs. Later, square plans with flat roofs were added, as well as butterfly roofs on existing plans. Later homes of all plan types were constructed from standardized modular wall panels, further giving design cohesiveness to the community. Thus, any evaluation as to harmony and conformity must take into account both the similarities and differences that have existed in the design of our community from the beginning.

 

When opportunities for replacement of nonconforming elements such as gutters, windows, roofs, fences, and other features occur, homeowners should comply with the design guidelines. As these improvements are made, the appearance of our community will be enhanced.

 

The DRC may receive requests for the use of new materials and technologies that have not previously been used in Hollin Hills. The DRC may consider the use of such materials, technologies, and strategies provided they meet the standards of harmony and conformity. Hollin Hills is a special place and will remain so as long as we continue to uphold our design guidelines.

 

The following standards are meant to guide homeowners and the DRC in evaluating whether proposed designs are in harmony and conformity with other structures in Hollin Hills. Additionally, it is the homeowner’s responsibility to comply with all relevant Fairfax County codes and requirements. The DRC only reviews projects for compliance with these design guidelines.

 

A. Site Design

 

Standards of original design

There is variety in the placement, or siting, of Hollin Hills houses, a feature that distinguishes our community from other subdivisions. This siting variation is apparent whether one is driving through or flying overhead. It is a feature that should be preserved.

 

Unlike most suburban developments, the lots in Hollin Hills were subdivided not in terms of rectangular principles, but in response to the contours of the land and the ultimate living pleasure of the individual homeowners. Goodman and Davenport selected houses for the lots from among the various standard plans available, depending on the contours of the site. House siting in Hollin Hills took into consideration the orientation to the sun, tree locations, potential long views, and the relationship between adjoining houses. The houses were seldom sited parallel to the street. They are not wedged into orderly rows, with each house parallel to the street and separated from passersby by a rectangular expanse of lawn. As the streets were laid out with respect to the slope of the land, houses naturally were placed at an angle to the street. These principles were—and should continue to be—applied consistently throughout the community.

 

Certain house plans evolved, for instance, in response to the topography to allow a minimum of re-grading in order to retain a natural appearance. Views from our homes “borrow” vistas from adjacent yards, making our yards appear more spacious. This characteristic is an essential design element in Hollin Hills.

 

Driveways were originally gravel to reduce their visual impact, with the added benefits of being permeable and less costly than asphalt or concrete.

 

Professional landscape designs came with many of the homes. The plantings throughout the neighborhood are now, in general, lush and mature.

 

Additional design review considerations

 

Siting

The placement of any occupied or accessory structure(s) on a site should achieve a natural extension of the original conditions of the site and existing house.

 

In keeping with the original vision of Hollin Hills, the plans for all future additions and new construction should conform to the characteristics of the land.

 

Grading and Drainage

Avoid designs that may require extensive grading, cut, or fill. Use existing elevations of the ground as the floor elevations of any structures to the extent possible. Structures should blend with the slope of the topography and should step with the slope to fit the natural terrain. Contain runoff water drainage to the site or adjacent streets. Use of site retaining walls should be minimized.

 

Please note that Fairfax County codes include strict requirements for drainage and provide for the protection of neighbors from changes to topography which may increase runoff onto their property. Please consult Fairfax County codes before undertaking such a project.

 

Orientation

Structures should be oriented to ensure privacy, preserve views, and allow good sun exposure for the site under consideration while also protecting these features for neighbors. Any uphill addition or new house should not tower over its downhill neighbors so as to intrude on their privacy. Following Goodman’s model, structures should be sited to the fall of the land.

 

 

"Building views should slide by the adjoining houses for long vistas that cut across several lots. This enhances the sense of space that is a primary feature of the community."

 

 

Sensitivity to neighboring sites is critical, particularly in relation to meeting the needs of any public rights-of-way (e.g., sidewalks, paths) and to achieving a harmonious blend of woodland space and house sites. Designs should be oriented to produce free-flowing spaces with a semi-cleared woodland character, and additions, fences, accessory structures, decks, etc, should avoid reinforcing property lines or any other geometric pattern not associated with the house.

 

Building views should slide by the adjoining houses for long vistas that cut across several lots. This enhances the sense of space that is a primary feature of the community.

 

Fencing and Screen Walls

In general, fences are not in harmony and conformity with the character of the landscape of the community. Fences are not permitted in the front yard or in side yards next to streets. If fences are absolutely necessary or required by code, they should be sited so as not to be border fences or prominently visible from the street and should avoid reinforcing property lines or any other geometric pattern not associated with the house. If visual privacy is required, dense hedges or a spot privacy screen of architectural character may be used.

 

Fencing that creates a visual barrier is to be avoided. The more transparent or open the fence the better. Chain link, stockade, western, split rail, snow, chicken, or wind gate fences are not compatible with Hollin Hills design. Welded-wire grid fencing, supported on metal posts, is better, but all fencing is discouraged. Fence posts should be on the inside face of the fence, and plantings should be used in conjunction with the transparent fence to minimize its appearance. Screen or garden walls—typical of the original Hollin Hills design— are acceptable if kept in short distances and low in height.

 

Driveways and Walkways

Driveway material should minimize the visual impact on the overall landscape. Permeable driveways are encouraged.

 

Patios and Decks

To maintain the concept of shared vistas, patios or decks should be designed so as to create small, intimate areas that are set into, and are in harmony with, the landscape and neighboring vistas. If more than one patio or deck is desired, each patio or deck will be limited to 50 percent of the square footage of existing house. The existing house is defined by the footprint of the house and does not include second stories, carports, sheds, overhangs, or other attached or nonattached structures.

 

If multiple patios or decks are desired, they should be separated by at least six feet. The cumulative impact of all decks and patios should not diminish the primacy of the house in its setting and should not overwhelm the landscape or the scale of the house. Pathways or walkways may connect patios or decks.

 

Other considerations for patios and decks:

  • Second floor decks on the street façade of a house are discouraged
  • Plantings should be provided at post foun- dations and on low decks to screen structural elements and to soften visual impact
  • The materials, in terms of color and size of members, should appear as a natural extension of the house
  • Deck railings should be of a minimal size and as transparent as If the deck is low to the ground, which is preferred, railings can often be eliminated totally, although patios and decks must conform to Fairfax County codes.
  • Other deck features such as hot tubs should not be visible to neighbors or from streets or sidewalks

B. Building Scale, Form, and Roofline

Standards of original design

Hollin Hills houses are of relatively small scale, in keeping with typical house sizes in the 1950s– 1970s. They take the form of rectangular boxes that sit lightly in the landscape. They are neither heavy nor imposing. The large windows give the houses an open and transparent quality, often literally allowing one to look through them. At night they glow from the light within.

 

The rooflines provide a strong horizontal emphasis that, especially in the single story plans, allow our homes to blend into the landscape.

 

Additional design review considerations

The slope of Hollin Hills roofs have a very shallow pitch or are flat. As it is, they appear to float. This effect should be maintained in all future additions and construction.

 

 

"The rooflines provide a strong horizontal emphasis that, especially in the single story plans, allow our homes to blend into the landscape."

 

 

The DRC shall ensure that additions and new construction conform to the immediate surrounding context. Additions should be in proportion to and in context with the original house and should form an integral part of a complete design. In other words, additions should integrate the design elements of the existing structure. Additions should not be obvious grafts onto the original house, and the new structure should be in proportion to the existing house in height, width, and volume. (Please reference the diagrams in Appendix B for suggested maximum heights. These heights are intended for general ref- erence to help designs be in appropriate scale with other structures in Hollin Hills; maximum heights may vary depending on the context of a particular  project. Fairfax County code and zoning may further restrict maximum heights.)

 

Structures should blend with and respond to the adjacent houses. Future additions and new construction should be sympathetic to surrounding structures and should be tailored to the land, and it is important that the design of any new building or structure strive to maintain the neighborhood network of vistas and exterior living spaces.

 

Exceptions to these guidelines will be permitted on a case-by-case bases for additions to existing structures that were not designed by Goodman/Davenport and did not employ their design principles. Additions to such structures shall maintain the design elements of the existing structure.

 

The maximum ratio of structure size to lot area shall be governed by Fairfax County code and zoning. However, any addition or new construction should be appropriately scaled so as not to overwhelm the lot or significantly diminish the open free flowing character of the neighborhood. Hollin Hills homes are generally small scaled and sited to have plenty of open space and borrowed vistas across lots. Maintaining this character will be an important basis for considering any additions or new construction.

 

Homeowners are encouraged to preserve as much of the original house as possible.

 

C. Exterior Walls and Materials

 

Standards of original design

Hollin Hills houses are very simply detailed. There are no brackets, cornices, or elaborate moldings around window or door frames. The resulting clean and uncluttered lines are characteristic of the entire community. The walls of Hollin Hills houses are unornamented, planar surfaces with tall, rectangular openings.

 

Early plans gave little indication from the exterior of interior partitions. The small, atypical windows in the bathrooms hinted at the function of the room inside, for instance, but there was no exterior manifestation of the placement of interior partitions.

 

Later plans used 12-foot-long modular wall panels, manufactured on site, most commonly in a window-panel-window arrangement. Interior partitions were invariably placed to coincide with the joint between adjacent modular panels, making a strong correlation between the interior plan and exterior fenestration.

 

The facades are primarily wood with usedbrick fireplace walls and some used-brick or concrete block panels without windows. The fireplace walls and masonry panels serve a secondary function of providing bracing against lateral (wind) loads. The short wing walls at the fireplace end of the first floor of some two-story homes serve the same purpose.

 

Foundation walls, where they are visible above ground, are generally concrete block.

 

The most common exterior material is painted wood: tongue-and-groove siding (vertical butted boards), T-1-11 panels (plywood with grooves cut every 4”), and some clapboard, wood window and door frames that are also structural, solid-panel wood doors, etc.

 

The lack of ornamentation is another distinguishing characteristic. Instead of applied ornament, the texture of the building elements gives variety to the various planar surfaces, as in the used-brick and painted concrete block panel walls and used-brick fireplaces, the regular pattern of T-1-11 or clapboard siding, and the gravelly texture of the built-up roofs.

 

Exterior hardware and lighting is simple, unadorned and modern, following the overall design philosophy. Additional Design Review Considerations Exterior materials used on additions shall beharmonious with the existing structure.

 

New structures shall utilize siding and façade features that are representative of Hollin Hills structures.

 

D. Windows and Doors

 

Standards of original design

The upper sashes were originally glazed with a single thickness of plate glass. The operable sash is approximately 25” high, although some window walls have a taller lower sash to line up with the sill height of the adjacent kitchen windows. The original lower sashes were either steel casement windows (early) or steel awning windows (later). The switch to awning windows removed the vertical bar from the center of the lower sash, giving the windows a cleaner design. A key aspect of Hollin Hills window design is that the frames are unusually thin and unobtrusive. The steel lower sashes only project in 1-1/4” from the wooden frames, minimizing the change in the overall window profile.

 

Exterior doors were unornamented, flush-style, or glazed. Where glass doors were used, they were either standard height with one full-size glass opening and with a glass transom above, or were the same height as a window with a single horizontal cross bar the same size as— and aligned with—the cross bar in adjacent windows.

 

Additional design review considerations

Doors should be either flush or full panel glass doors with top and bottom rails and side stiles. Multi-panel or divided-light doors, such as six-panel colonial style doors, are not appropriate in Hollin Hills.

 

Replacement patio doors in window walls shall be sized to avoid additional trim and maintain the standard 2” by 6” window frame appearance.

 

Windows should be similar in size, shape and ori- entation to Hollin Hills designs.

 

Exceptions to these guidelines will be permitted on a case-by-case basis for existing structures that were not designed by Goodman/ Davenport and that do not utilize their design principles. Changes and additions to such non-Goodman/Davenport structures shall utilize window designs which are congruous with the existing structure.

 

E. Roofs and Gutters

 

Standards of original design

Hollin Hills roofs are either low-slope or flat. The low-slope roofs are most commonly gable roofs with some butterfly and shed roofs.

 

Gutters, if any, are simply rectangular box gutters that appear to be a part of the roof edge rather than attached ornament.

 

The roofs typically have large overhangs that provide shade for our large windows in the summer but allow the low winter sun to penetrate deeply into our homes. A second important feature of the overhangs is to keep rainwater off our wooden walls, prolonging their lives. The large overhangs are supported by thin (2” by 3”) outriggers, extensions of the roof joists that allow the roof edge to appear thin and light. The full structural thickness of the roof is thus hidden. Compare the size of the space above both the inside and outside of a Hollin Hills window to see the difference. Not all house plans have large overhangs, however. The square, flat-roof plans have no overhangs.

 

 

"Hollin Hills roofs are either low-slope or flat. The low-slope roofs are most commonly gable roofs with some butterfly and shed roofs."

 

 

The original built-up roofs were built up of layers of asphalt and felt covered with slag/cinders, with few penetrations such as skylights or protruding vents.

 

Additional design review considerations

Roofing materials should retain the visual appearance of the original built-up roofs:

  • Sloped roofs should be of a light (off-white to gray) color, gravelly-textured, and give thappearance of ballast made of rocks, marble chips, shale, or other natural, small aggregate.
  • Appropriately detailed shingle roofs may meet this criteria. Shingles should be simple square three-tab design with uniform color and no artifi- cial shadow lines or highly contrasting tab Slate, tile, shake, or highly varigated style shingles will not be approved.
  • Standing seam metal roofing may be consid- ered for approval by the DRC
  • Flat roofs that are visible should retain the visual appearance of the original built-up Flat roofs should be of a light (white to gray) color. Where flat roofs are not visible, other roofing materials such as EPDM and TPO may be used.
  • Rolled roofing with seams that create visual horizontal bands will not be approved on sloped roofs.

The use of sloped rigid insulation can help improve drainage on flat roofs; however, careful consideration should be given to maintaining the narrow and consistent roof edge profile typical of Hollin Hills. Adding sloped insulation to a roof requires DRC approval even if the roofing membrane is an in-kind replacement.

 

Gutters should be simple square box style gutters. Decorative ogee or “K” profile gutters are not appropriate. In-kind replacement of ogee gutters is strongly discouraged.

 

Protruding roof vents should be minimized in number and size. Careful consideration should be given to views of vents from street and neighboring properties.

 

When an in-kind replacement is considered, the roofing contractor may not initially discuss all of the elements that are needed to complete the project. The homeowner should meet with the roofing contractor to confirm the type and number of vents, flashing material, and other visible elements prior to any agreement with contractor.

 

Green roofs, solar panels, and other new technologies require DRC approval. Consideration should be given to visibility and sightlines. Homeowners and the DRC shall work together to develop a solution that minimizes the visual impact of such roofs, while keeping in mind the possible benefit of the technology.

  • Green roofs: Specific consideration should be given to the structural, technical, and construction Many types of green roofing exist, and not all may be appropriate for the Hollin Hills style of construction. It is strongly recommended that the homeowner consult with the DRC prior to the commencement of design services.
  • Solar panels and other alternative energy technologies: Homeowners should be aware of any specific laws or codes pertaining to the use and application of these

F. Colors

 

Standards of original design

In keeping with the setting, the original palette of exterior colors used earth-toned stains and paints in colors such as warm gray, graybrown, deep brown, clay red, black, graygreen, and cadmium yellow. Interestingly, the original interior colors were similar.

 

Trim, window and door frames, eaves, and soffits were white to highlight the architectural details. The white trim around the windows provided a seemingly unbroken plane from the interior to the exterior, further minimizing the window detail.

 

Additional design review considerations

New and existing structures should be painted with earth-tone colors. The color of additions should be harmonious with existing structures. Loud or highly contrasting colors are discouraged.

 

Monochromatic color schemes are not appropriate. Trim, window and door frames, eaves, and soffits should be a different color from the siding.

 

Though painting does not require DRC approval, homeowners are encouraged to seek DRC guidance when considering color changes.


G. Garages, Carports, and non-attached Structures

 

Standards of original design

Garages, which by their very nature are not light or transparent, were virtually unknown in original Hollin Hills construction. Carports, while not common, have in some cases been a successful compromise, providing shelter from the elements while maintaining a light and open character.

 

Additional design review considerations

Garages are discouraged. Carports and garages are permissible when they can be integrated within the Standards of Original Design. All attached and nonattached structures must be in harmony and conformity with house and site, as well as with the larger Hollin Hills aesthetic.

 

Non attached structures such as sheds shall be designed to be in harmony and conformity with Hollin Hills design.

 


 

Section V – Procedures for Approval

The DRC can serve as a valuable resource for Hollin Hills homeowners interested in altering their homes. Informal guidance from the DRC can be obtained prior to the development of the final proposed design and specifications. Homeowners who are planning to make changes to the exterior of their homes are encouraged to submit concept sketches or other preliminary designs prior to submitting a formal application. While presentation of conceptual plans does not start the formal approval process, sharing proposals before they are finalized can be helpful in preparing plans for approval and save applicants time and effort.

 


 

The Application Process

 

Step 1: Determine the Appropriate Type of Review

There are three types of review under these guidelines. To determine the review type for the project, the applicant should contact the DRC. Based on the information provided by the applicant about the project, the DRC will make an initial determination regarding the type of review required and will respond to the applicant with this determination, or to request additional information, within three business days.

 

The DRC may change the type of review required at any time if it decides that the initial determination was incorrect. The DRC may also change the review type required if the initial description of the project was incomplete or if the scope of the project changes. In those cases, the DRC may require the application to be resubmitted as a new project, including all of the steps required for the applicable review type.

 

The three categories of review are

1. Administrative review: For projects that have only a minor impact on the appearance of the These include replacement or minor modifications to windows and doors and other minor exterior changes.

2. Standard review: For projects that result in signif- icant changes to the appearance of the These include small additions such as storage closets, entry vestibules, decks, sheds, and fences.

3. Expanded review: For projects that have a major impact on the appearance of the property and These include additions, the addition of a second story, and the construction of new homes.

The application requirements and review process for each of the three categories are described below.

 

Step 2: Follow the Appropriate Review Process

 

Administrative Review

1. Project Description. Applicants shall provide a detailed description of the project to the DRC and any additional documentation that the DRC To expedite review, applicants are encouraged to submit their requests to the DRC electronically.

 

2. Neighbor Notification. Neighbor notification is not required.

 

3. DRC Review. The DRC will review the information supplied by the applicant and respond to the applicant within five business days. The DRC may approve the project, propose changes, require additional information, require a different type of review, or deny approval. If changes or additional information are required, the DRC will review and respond within five business days of receipt of the required information.

 

4. DRC Decision. If the application is approved, the DRC will issue a If denied, the DRC will provide the applicant with written reasons for the denial.

 

Standard Review

Applicants are encouraged to submit informal drawings to the DRC for comment prior to submitting a formal application as described in the process below. Applicants requesting informal comment must contact the DRC 10 calendar days prior to the meeting to request they be placed on the agenda.

 

1. Submission of Application. To be placed on the agenda, applications requiring standard review must be submitted to the DRC ten calendar days prior to a scheduled DRC meeting. The DRC will post the following information on the CAHH web site seven calendar days before the meeting: the address of the project, project description, list of neighbors notified, expected time the agenda item will be discussed, and note that it is a “standard review application.” Applicants are encouraged to submit their applications to the DRC electronically. The application must include:

     A. A copy of the neighbor notification letter (as described in item 2   below), a list of addresses to which the letter was sent, and dates the letters were sent to each address.

     B. Written documentation sufficiently comprehensive to convey the full scope and details of the See appendix C for the Application Checklist.

 

2. Neighbor Notification. Before an application is submitted to the DRC, the applicant must notify the neighbors. Any application submitted without documentation of neighbor notification completed according to the guidelines below will be denied. Any Hollin Hills residents who can see the proposed project from their property must be notified with a letter, including those who are not adjacent property holders. When in doubt, notify. The purpose of the letter is to inform the neighbors of the project and provide them with an opportunity to comment to the homeowner and/or DRC. The letter must contain the applicant’s address and contact information (phone number and/or e-mail address); a brief description of the project and its location on the property; and information about how the detailed plans may be reviewed in advance of the DRC meeting. The letter shall further instruct the recipients to consult the CAHH website for information regarding the date, time, and location of the DRC review of the application. A sample neighbor notification letter is provided in Appendix E. The DRC may, at its discre- tion, determine that additional neighbor notification is required at any time during the review process.

 

3. DRC Site Visits. The DRC or individual members of the DRC may, at their discretion, conduct site visits at any time during the review process. Site visits shall be scheduled by agreement with the applicant.

 

4. DRC Meeting

     A. At the meeting, the applicant shall submit two hard copies of the complete One set will be returned to the applicant and one set will be kept by the DRC for its records.

     B. For the application to be reviewed, the applicant or his/her representative must be in attendance to present the application and respond to questions.

     C. All Hollin Hills homeowners may attend the meeting as described below in paragraph 5 of the DRC Processes section.

 

5. DRC Decision. At the meeting, the DRC will review the application and provide commentary on the design. The DRC will respond to the applicant at the meeting or within three business days of the meeting. At that time, the DRC may approve the application, propose changes, require additional information, require a different type of review, or deny approval. If the DRC does not approve the application, the application will be considered denied until the applicant submits a revised application that addresses the DRC’s comments. For minor changes or minor alternations to details, the DRC may, at its discretion, review changes between meetings without requiring resubmission of the application and approve or deny the application based on the changes. However, in those cases, the changes must be documented on the hard copies of the application retained by the DRC and the applicant.

 

6. DRC Placard. If the application is approved, the DRC will issue a placard within three business The pacard must be posted at the site and be clearly visible from the street. If denied, the DRC will provide the applicant written reasons for the denial.

 

Expanded Review

Applicants for projects requiring expanded review are encouraged to submit informal drawings to the DRC for comment prior to submitting a formal application as described in the process below. Applicants requesting informal comment must contact the DRC ten calendar days prior to the meeting to request a space on the agenda.

 

In order that the community may have a greater opportunity to comment on large projects applications requiring expanded review must be presented at no fewer than two separate DRC meetings, one to receive conceptual approval for the project and one to receive final approval.

 

1. Submission of Application. To be placed on the agenda, applications requiring expanded review must be submitted to the DRC 10 calendar days prior to a scheduled meeting. The DRC will post the following information on the CAHH web site seven calendar days before the meeting: the address of the project, project description, list of addresses notified, expected time the agenda item will be discussed, and a note that it is an “expanded review application, initial meeting.” Applicants are encouraged to submit their applications to the DRC electronically. The application must include:

     A. A copy of the neighbor notification letter (as described in item 2 below), a list of addresses to which the letter was sent, and dates the letters were sent to each address

     B. Written documentation sufficiently comprehensive to convey the full scope and details of the See appendix C for the Application Checklist.

 

2. Neighbor Notification. Before an application is submitted to the DRC, the applicant must notify the neighbors. Any application submitted without documentation of neighbor notification completed according to the guidelines below will be Any Hollin Hills residents who can see the proposed project from their property must be notified with a letter, including those who are not adjacent property holders. When in doubt, notify. The purpose of the letter is to inform the neighbors of the project and provide them with an opportunity to comment to the homeowner and/or DRC. The letter must contain the applicant’s address and contact information (phone number and/or e-mail address), a brief description of the project and its location on the property, and information about how the detailed plans may be reviewed in advance of the DRC meeting. The letter shall further instruct the recipients to consult the CAHH website for information on the date, time, and location of the DRC review of the application. A sample neighbor notification letter is provided in Appendix E. The DRC may, at its discretion, determine that additional neighbor notification is required at any time during the review process.

 

3. DRC Site Visits. The DRC or individual members of the DRC may, at their discretion, conduct site visits at any time during the review process. Site visits shall be scheduled by agreement with the applicant.

 

4. Yard Sign. The DRC shall install a yard sign with the project description in front of the house seven calendar days prior to the initial meeting. The sign shall not be removed until final approval is granted or the application is withdrawn. The sign shall direct readers to the CAHH website for more information about the project.

 

5. DRC Meeting to Consider Conceptual Approval. (This is the first of two DRC review meetings required under Expanded Review)

     A. At the meeting, the applicant shall submit two hard copies of the complete application. One set will be returned to the applicant and one set will be kept by the DRC for its records.

     B. For the application to be reviewed, the applicant or his/her representative must be in attendance to present the application and respond to questions.

     C. All Hollin Hills homeowners may address the meeting as described below in paragraph 5 of the processes section.

 

6. DRC Decision Regarding Conceptual.  At the meeting, the DRC will review the application and provide commentary on the project. The DRC will respond to the applicant at the meeting or within three business days of the meeting. At that time, the DRC may issue conceptual approval of the application, propose changes, require additional information, require a different type of review, or deny approval. If the DRC does not approve the application, the application will be considered denied until the applicant submits a revised application that addresses the DRC’s comments. For minor changes or minor alterations to details, the DRC may, at its discretion, review changes between meetings without requiring resubmission of the application and provide conceptual approval or denial of the application based on the changes. However, in those cases, the changes must be documented on the hard copies of the application retained by the DRC and the applicant. In rare circumstances, conceptual approval may be withdrawn if the DRC determines that it has seriously misjudged the impact of the project on the neighbors and neighborhood or if it has received incorrect or misleading information from the applicant.

 

7. Submission of Final Plans. To be placed on the DRC meeting agenda to receive final approval for an application requiring expanded review, an applicant must submit final plans consistent with the conceptual approval to the DRC 10 calendar days prior to the meeting. The DRC will post the following information on the CAHH website seven calendar days before the meeting: address of the project, project description, list of addresses notified, expected time the agenda item will be discussed, and a note that it is an “expanded review application, meeting to consider final approval.”

 

8. DRC Meeting to Consider Final Approval. This is the second phase of the DRC expanded review process.

     A. At the meeting, the applicant shall submit two hard copies of the complete final application. One set will be returned to the applicant and one set will be kept by the DRC for its

     B, For the application to be reviewed, the applicant or his representative must be in attendance to present the application and respond to

     C. All Hollin Hills homeowners may attend the meeting as described below in paragraph 5 of the DRC Processes section,

 

9. DRC Decision Regarding Final Approval. At the meeting, the DRC will review the final application and provide commentary. The DRC will respond to the applicant within three business days of the meeting. At that time, the DRC may provide final approval of the application, propose changes, require additional information, or deny approval. If the DRC does not approve the application, the application will be considered denied until the applicant submits a revised application that addresses the DRC’s com- ments. For minor changes or minor alterations to details, the DRC may, at its discretion, review changes between meetings without requiring resubmission of the application, and approve or deny the application based on the changes. However, in those cases, the changes must be documented on the hard copies of the application retained by the DRC and the applicant.

 

10. DRC Placard. If the application is approved, the DRC will issue a placard within three business The pacard must be posted at the site and be clearly visible from the street. If denied, the DRC will provide the applicant written reasons for the denial.

 


 

DRC Processes

 

1. Meetings: The DRC shall meet a minimum of every thirty (30) days if applications are pending. The DRC will decide if any additional meetings are necessary. The DRC will review projects at the scheduled meeting and provide applicants with commentary on their applications. Final decisions will be made at the meeting or within three (3) business days of the meeting.

 

2. Site Visits: With prior arrangement with the applicant, any or all committee members may visit the premises of an applicant for a site review.

 

3. Agendas: The DRC will post all agenda items, including the project address and description and the approximate time each agenda item will be discussed, on the CAHH website seven calendar days prior to any meeting.

 

4. Applications: The time for consideration of an application under these guidelines and the covenant does not begin until the application is complete. An application is not considered complete until the applicant has met all of the requirements for submission of an application for the appropriate type of review, including submission of plans, neighbor notification (if required), and meeting the deadline for submission prior to a meeting. Any project that is submitted less than ten calendar days prior to a meeting shall not be considered complete until ten calendar days prior to the next scheduled meeting.

 

5. Community Participation: Any Hollin Hills resident or non-resident owner is welcome to attend DRC meetings as an observer, view the plans, and listen to the discussion. Any Hollin Hills resident or non-resident owner wishing to address the com- mittee may request to be on the speakers list for a specific project up to two days prior to the Speakers may be added to the list at the meeting at the DRC’s discretion. The DRC will set time limits for speakers appropriate to the circumstances (e.g., time constraints, number of speakers). Any Hollin Hills resi dent or non-resident owner may make his or her views known about any proposed project to a DRC member. The DRC will give comments such weight as it deems reasonable and appropriate. If sufficient concerns are expressed, the DRC may defer the application pending an additional meeting at which the concerned neighbors may speak. If the applicant does not wish to address expressed concerns, the DRC may then approve or reject the application as it deems appropriate.

 

6. Voting: Every DRC decision, including those pertaining to determination of type of review and administrative review decisions, requires a simple majority vote. At least three DRC members must participate (either at a meeting or electronically) to transact business. Approvals of standard review and expanded review applications require a simple majority vote of all members. Approvals of applications are final and may not be reversed. Denials are subject to appeal through the appeals process described below.

 

7. Decisions: If the DRC approves an application, it will issue a placard to the applicant within three business days of the If the DRC denies an application, it will provide written reasons for the denial.

 

8. Placards: An 8-1/2 x 11 inch placard shall be provided to the applicant by the DRC when the application has been approved. During construction this placard must be posted by the applicant so that it is clearly visible from the street. The placard shall indicate the project address, type of project, and date of approval.

 

9. Records and Reports: All DRC decisions and actions shall be recorded in the DRC records and summarized in the Hollin Hills Bulletin and on the CAHH website, except for determinations of no review required as noted in that section.

 


 

Actions Required Prior to Construction

1. The homeowner is responsible for obtaining all required local building permits.

2. Construction activities, including delivery of material, demolition, and earth work, may not commence until final DRC approval has been has been granted.

3. Building construction must commence within two years of the date of application approval. If construction has not started within two years, the application must be resubmitted.

 


 

Actions During Construction

1. Approved applications may be followed by inspection for compliance. The applicant will be notified in advance of such an inspection.

2. When construction is started at variance with the approved application or without approval, the DRC shall report to the CAHH board with its recommendations for action.

3. If an apparently unapproved project commences, any homeowner can notify the DRC at once.

4. Immediately after completion of the project, the homeowner shall confirm to the DRC in writing (via email or letter) that the project has been completed as approved by the DRC and at the DRC’s request shall submit documentation, such as record photos.

 


 

Appeal Procedure

The appeal process provides applicants with an avenue to address grievances or disagreements with the DRC’s decisions. Accordingly, if, and only if, the DRC denies an application, the applicant may appeal the DRC’s decision through the following process:

 

1. Any applicant may file an appeal with the CAHH board within 30 days of the date of the DRC’s decision on an application. A copy of any appeal must be provided to the DRC concurrently with its submission to the Appeals may be filed in writing or by email, and should be sent to the CAHH president and the DRC chair.

2. An appeal must be based on a claim that the application was denied even though it was consistent with the covenants and the Design Review Guidelines set forth in this document. An appeal that includes a revision to the denied application will be denied; any revised applications must be submitted to the DRC for review.

 

3. The DRC shall submit a written response to the appeal to the CAHH board within 15 days of the date the appeal is received by the CAHH board.

 

4. The board will consider the appeal at its next regularly-scheduled meeting after the date the DRC response is The applicant and the DRC will be permitted to present their views on why an appeal should be granted or denied and to respond to questions from the board.

 

5. The DRC’s decision will be affirmed unless two-thirds of the CAHH board members present at the meeting where the appeal is considered agree to reverse the DRC’s If the CAHH board grants the appeal, it may approve the application as submitted or send the application back to the DRC with specific recommendations on how to reconsider the application.

 

6. If an applicant is not satisfied with the results of an appeal, that party may request mediation or may seek relief from state court. A party is entitled to propose arbitration or seek relief from state court only if the appeal process has been completed.

 


 

Enforcement

The DRC is responsible for enforcing the design covenant, the Design Review Guidelines, and its own decisions. A homeowner’s failure to obtain DRC approval for a project covered by the design covenant and the design guidelines set forth in this document is also a violation of the design covenant and the design guidelines set forth in this document. In that event, the DRC and/or the CAHH may take appropriate action to enforce the design covenant and the design guidelines set forth in this document.

 

When an infraction comes to the attention of the DRC, the DRC shall contact the homeowner and advise the homeowner how to comply with the Design Review Guidelines. If an unapproved project is under construction, or if construction is proceeding in a manner that is inconsistent with the approvals previously obtained, a stop work order shall be issued by the DRC immediately. Unapproved projects completed in a short time without official opposition or notice are not considered to be approved and will be subject to review, removal, or alteration.

 

If the homeowner refuses to cooperate with the DRC to resolve an infraction, or ignores a stop work order, the case shall be referred immediately to the CAHH board for further action, including legal action if necessary.

 

Any project started or completed without DRC approval is subject to the approval process for that type of project as described in Section IV.

 


 

Section VI: Composition and Role of the Design Review Committee

The name of the building reviewing committee shall be the Design Review Committee (DRC) (formerly the Architectural Review Committee). The DRC shall consist of five members. It should be a balanced group of men and women. All members must be Hollin Hills homeowners and nonmembers of the CAHH board. The DRC should represent a cross section of the community.

 

There shall be up to three members who are either architects or design professionals, one of which must be an architect. Members of the DRC shall serve two-year terms, staggered to assure continuity, and no member may serve for more than two consecutive terms. The CAHH board shall appoint members to the DRC to the extent possible based on these criteria.

 

The DRC shall elect its own chairman. No member of the DRC may participate in the deliberation of his/her own or a client’s building plans. All DRC members shall serve at the pleasure of the CAHH board. The DRC’s role is to:

 

1. Provide advice on design concepts

2. Review design plans

3. Monitor construction

4. Recommend action when unapproved construction is commenced or when construction departs from approval

5. Interview prospective DRC candidates and make recommendations to the CAHH board

6. Update the Design Review Guidelines for com- munity approval

7. Revise procedures as necessary

 


 

Appendix